High Point 6550 32nd Avenue Southwest • Seattle , Washington

Designer(s)

SvR Design Company; Mithūn; Bruce Meyers; see Seattle Housing Authority website for many additional consultants

Client(s)

Seattle Housing Authority with GSI assistance from Seattle Public Utilities
High Point proclaims the community's stormwater management focus
High Point proclaims the community's stormwater management focus
High Point proclaims the community's stormwater management focus
High Point proclaims the community's stormwater management focus
High Point proclaims the community's stormwater management focus
High Point proclaims the community's stormwater management focus

Utility Goals

Reduce pollutant loads in rainwater
Reduce downstream damage from runoff
Safely move, control, contain rainwater
Capture rain for reuse (of all kinds, human and natural, from irrigation and toilet flushing to groundwater recharge)
Restore or create habitat

Utility

The basic stormwater management concept at High Point is capture, convey, cleanse, and either infiltrate or detain and discharge as much as possible, through a site-specific, sequential combination of management techniques on each block. Roof runoff travels via downspout to a flow-through filter planter or rain barrel or conveyance furrow or pipe/pop-up emitter to a rain garden. Further runoff infiltrates through porous paving or flows via grassy swales to dispersal trenches along sidewalks. If that doesn’t address all rain volume, excess runoff then moves to NDS swales that run along street rights-of way and any remaining runoff from huge storms goes to a large, central, wet detention basin.  Overall, High Point strives to achieve a 40% pervious/60% impervious ratio (compared to the city’s typical 25%/75%), and successfully reverts 8% of the Longfellow Creek basin to pre-development pasture conditions.

Amenity Goals

Education
Recreation
Safety
Public Relations
Aesthetic Richness

Amenity

Rarely have we encountered an ARD that so joyfully celebrates rain—and in a 120-acre community, no less!  The developers’ commitment to use the natural drainage system as a means to promote community is insightful, commendable, and evident throughout the property: High Point’s branding message focuses on environmental stewardship, and especially rain.  The prevalence of this unified message undoubtedly contributes to a sense of place and community: residents of High Point know what this place is about, and everyone who lives here “buys in” to this ethic.   Let’s hope that High Point’s “rain brand” becomes a national model.

Awards & More Information

Awards

2003 / Landscape Planning Award: Washington Society of Landscape Architects
2003 / Master Plan Design Award: Seattle Design Commission
2003 / Gold Nugget Award: Pacific Coast Builders
2005 / Communities Award: Seattle BuiltGreen Design Competition
2006 / Show You’re Green Award: AIA
2006 / Certificate of Merit: BuiltGreen
2006 / Outstanding Achievement Award: Energy Star
2006 / Green Leaf Award: International Society of Arboriculturists
2007 / Multifamily Project of the Year: NAHB National Green Building Award
2006 / Community Informed Design Award: AIA/HUD Secretary’s Award
2007 / Housing Committee Award (Multi-family): AIA
2007 / Rudy Bruner Award for Urban Excellence: Silver Medalist
2007 / BuiltGreen Hammer Award
2007 / Vision 2020 Award: Puget Sound Regional Council
2007 / Gold Nugget Award: Master-Planned Community of the Year: PCBC
2007 / Gold Nugget Award: Best Infill, Redevelopment, or Rehab Site Plan: PCBC
2007 / Governor’s Smart Communities: Jury’s Merit Award
2007 / National Award for Smart Growth Achievement, Built Projects: EPA
2007 / Award of Excellence, Americas: Urban Land Institute
2007 / Global Award of Excellence: Urban Land Institute